Instrument Details

2016 Borghino Shakti Madagascar Rosewood/Italian
SOLD
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Specs
Status
Sold
Brand
Borghino Guitars
Builder
Borghino Guitars
Product Year
2016
Model
Shakti
Serial #
003
UPC
702685044682
SKU
TMP226
Body Type(s)
Large, Jumbo
Back & Sides
Rosewood - Madagascar
Top
Spruce - Italian
Neck Wood
Mahogany - Cuban
Neck Profile
C
Bridge
Ebony - Macassar
Rosette
Abalone and MOP
Top Trim
Abalone
Fingerboard
Ebony - Macassar
Fingerboard Bindings
Ebony - Macassar
Fret Markers
Side Dots
Frets to Body
14
Headplate
Ebony - Macassar
Headstock Bindings
Ebony - Macassar
Headstock Inlay
Builder Logo
Body Bindings
Ebony - Macassar
Tuners
Schaller
Tuner Finish
Gold
Cutaway
Florentine
Pickup
K&K FanTaStick
Body Length
20.875 in
Upper Bout
12.625 in
Lower Bout
17 in
Body Depth Heel
4 in
Body Depth Tail
4.75 in
Scale Length
25.4 in
Scale Length (mm)
645 mm
Nut Width
1.75 in
Nut Width (mm)
44.5 mm
String Spacing
2.13 in
String Spacing (mm)
54.1 mm
Weight
6 lb. 2 oz.
Case
Hardshell - Gator
Audio File
Description


What is a musician but one who constantly pushes on against the bleeding edge of sound? What is a luthier but one with that same drive, who challenges convention with their ceaseless experimentation? John McLaughlin (of Shakti fame) is one such musician, just as Mirko Borghino is one such luthier. The brand new Shakti model we have here today stands between these two great men as the very image of experimentation, and the means to achieve it.



McLaughlin's Indian fusion band from the 1970s, Shakti, offered one of the first tastes of the rich waters spanning the continents of Indian Classical music and Jazz--and at the heart of this group was McLaughlin and the first iteration of this guitar, all scalloped frets and diagonal sympathetic strings. The Borghino Shakti model here is the most recent version, done up in Madagascar Rosewood and Italian Spruce with dual K&K Fantastick undersaddle pickups and a stereo output which allows the player to amplify the regular bridge, the sympathetic strings, or both. The scalloped frets make for a truly featherweight fretting experience (no friction from your fingertips and the fretboard to slow you down), and it's easy to bend strings far and fast in the fashion of a Sitar. The seven diagonal strings offer complex overtones simply from the energy of the regular strings--but you can pluck or strum these baritone strings as well for a burst of color and volume. Borghino's attention to detail is surgical: the Abalone trim and rosette are stunning, crisply executed, and the scalloping of the fretboard is smooth and graceful.



For a guitar experience unlike anything else, this feat of lutherie is worth every penny. Losing yourself in your music is unavoidable with your hands on this Shakti.

I went back through some old recordings with John McLaughlin and Shakti after seeing this guitar at the Artisan Guitar Show. Of course I couldn't wait to play this one myself! The scalloped frets make left hand work effortless and fast, and there's something hard to describe about the character of the sympathetic strings. Mirko's done an amazing job building a unique instrument that just begs to experiment on.
 
I had a blast with this one. It's designed to sound somewhat like a sitar and has raised frets, a scalloped fingerboard, and a bridge saddle with a flatter top to encourage that sitar "twang" on the high E. The wound strings running perpendicular across the top are tuned to an open E chord and are designed to match the tuning of tabla drums.You can see John McLaughlin playing an early version of this guitar with Shakti in the 1970s version of the band. Really amazing.
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SCALE LENGTH 25.4 in
NUT WIDTH 1.75 in
STRING SPACING 2.13 in
WOODS SPRUCE - ITALIAN,
ROSEWOOD - MADAGASCAR

What is a musician but one who constantly pushes on against the bleeding edge of sound? What is a luthier but one with that same drive, who challenges convention with their ceaseless experimentation?
 

I went back through some old recordings with John McLaughlin and Shakti after seeing this guitar at the Artisan Guitar Show. Of course I couldn't wait to play this one myself!
 
I had a blast with this one. It's designed to sound somewhat like a sitar and has raised frets, a scalloped fingerboard, and a bridge saddle with a flatter top to encourage that sitar "twang" on the high E.
18440
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